tempbib11.bib

@INPROCEEDINGS{Atallah2000related,
  author = {Mikhail J. Atallah and Craig J. McDonough and Victor Raskin
    and Sergei Nirenburg},
  institution = {Purdue CERIAS},
  title = {Natural language processing for information assurance and security:
    an overview and implementations},
  booktitle = {NSPW '00:
    Proceedings of the 2000 workshop on New security paradigms},
  editor = {Mary Ellen Zurko and Steven J. Greenwald},
  location = {Ballycotton, County Cork, Ireland},
  month = {September},
  year = {2000},
  publisher = {ACM Press},
  isbn = {1-58113-260-3},
  pages = {51--65},
  doi = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/366173.366190},
  abstract = {The paper introduces and advocates an ontological semantic
    approach to information security. Both the approach and its resources, the
    ontology and lexicons, are borrowed from the field of natural language
    processing and adjusted to the needs of the new domain. The approach
    pursues the ultimate dual goals of inclusion of natural language data
    sources as an integral part of the overall data sources in information
    security applications, and formal specification of the information
    security community know-how for the support of routine and time-efficient
    measures to prevent and counteract computer attacks. As the first order of
    the day, the approach is seen by the information security community as a
    powerful means to organize and unify the terminology and nomenclature of
    the field.}
}
@INPROCEEDINGS{Raskin2001related,
  author = {Victor Raskin and Christian F. Hempelmann
    and Katrina E. Triezenberg and Sergei Nirenburg},
  institution = {Purdue CERIAS},
  title = {Ontology in information security:
    a useful theoretical foundation and methodological tool},
  booktitle = {NSPW '01:
    Proceedings of the 2001 workshop on New security paradigms},
  editor = {Victor Raskin and Steven J. Greenwald},
  location = {Cloudcroft, New Mexico},
  month = {September},
  year = {2001},
  publisher = {ACM Press},
  isbn = {1-58113-457-6},
  pages = {53--59},
  doi = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/508171.508180},
  url = {http://omni.cc.purdue.edu/~vraskin/NSPW-2001.pdf},
  abstract = {The paper introduces and advocates an ontological semantic
    approach to information security. Both the approach and its resources, the
    ontology and lexicons, are borrowed from the field of natural language
    processing and adjusted to the needs of the new domain. The approach
    pursues the ultimate dual goals of inclusion of natural language data
    sources as an integral part of the overall data sources in information
    security applications, and formal specification of the information
    security community know-how for the support of routine and time-efficient
    measures to prevent and counteract computer attacks. As the first order of
    the day, the approach is seen by the information security community as a
    powerful means to organize and unify the terminology and nomenclature of
    the field.}
}
@BOOK{Wayner2002related,
  author = {Peter Wayner},
  title = {Disappearing Cryptography
    -- Information Hiding: Steganography \& Watermarking},
  publisher = {Morgan Kaufmann Publishers},
  address = {Los Altos, CA 94022, USA},
  edition = {Second},
  pages = {xvii + 413},
  year = {2002},
  isbn = {1-55860-769-2},
  price = {USD 44.95},
  abstract = {Disappearing Cryptography, Second Edition describes how to take
    words, sounds, or images and hide them in digital data so that they look
    like other words, sounds, or images. When used properly, this powerful
    technique makes it almost impossible to trace the author or the recipient
    of a message. Conversations can be submerged in the flow of information
    through the Internet so that no one can know if a conversation exists at
    all.

    This full revision of the best-selling first edition describes a number of
    different techniques to hide information. These techniques include
    encryption (making data incomprehensible), steganography (embedding
    information into video, audio, or graphic files), watermarking (hiding
    data in the noise of image or sound files), mimicry ("dressing up" data
    and making it  appear to be other data), and others. This second edition
    also includes an expanded discussion on hiding information with
    spread-spectrum algorithms, shuffling tricks, and synthetic worlds. Each
    chapter is divided into sections, first providing an introduction and
    high-level summary for those who want to understand the concepts without
    wading through technical explanations, and then presenting greater detail
    for those who want to write their own programs.},
  note = {Chapters 6 and 7 serve as good introductions to mimic functions}
}
@INPROCEEDINGS{Bolshakov2004related,
  author = {Igor A. Bolshakov and Alexander Gelbukh},
  institution = {Center for Computing Research,
    National Polytechnic Institute, Mexico City, Mexico
      and
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Chung-Ang University,
    Seoul, Korea},
  title = {Synonymous Paraphrasing Using WordNet and Internet},
  booktitle = {Natural Language Processing and Information Systems:
    9th International Conference on Applications of Natural Language
    to Information Systems, NLDB 2004},
  editor = {Farid Meziane and Elisabeth Elisabeth Metais},
  location = {Salford, UK},
  month = {June},
  year = {2004},
  publisher = {Springer},
  series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
  volume = {3136},
  isbn = {3-540-22564-1},
  doi = {3-540-22564-1},
  pages = {312--323},
  abstract = {We propose a method of synonymous paraphrasing of a text based
    on WordNet synonymy data and Internet statistics of stable word
    combinations (collocations). Given a text, we look for words or
    expressions in it for which WordNet provides synonyms, and substitute them
    with such synonyms only if the latter form valid collocations with the
    surrounding words according to the statistics gathered from Internet. We
    present two important applications of such synonymous paraphrasing: (1)
    style-checking and correction: automatic evaluation and computer-aided
    improvement of writing style with regard to various aspects (increasing
    vs. decreasing synonymous variation, conformistic vs. individualistic
    selection of synonyms, etc.) and (2) steganography: hiding of additional
    information in the text by special selection of synonyms. A basic
    interactive algorithm of style improvement is outlined and an example of
    its application to editing of newswire text fragment in English is traced.
    Algorithms of style evaluation and information hiding are also proposed.}
}
@INPROCEEDINGS{Bergmair2004related,
  author = {Richard Bergmair and Stefan Katzenbeisser},
  title = {Towards Human Interactive Proofs in the Text-Domain},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 7th Information Security Conference},
  pages = {257--267},
  year = {2004},
  editor = {Kan Zhang and Yuliang Zheng},
  volume = {3225},
  series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
  month = {September},
  publisher = {Springer Verlag},
  location = {Palo Alto, CA},
  url = {http://bergmair.cjb.net/pub/towhiptext-proc.ps.gz},
  abstract = {We outline the linguistic problem of word-sense ambiguity
    and demonstrate its relevance to current computer security applications
    in the context of Human Interactive Proofs (HIPs). Such proofs enable a
    machine to automatically determine whether it is interacting with another
    machine or a human. HIPs were recently proposed to fight abuse of web
    services, denial-of-service attacks and spam. We describe the construction
    of an HIP that relies solely on natural language and draws its security
    from the problem of word-sense ambiguity, i.e., the linguistic phenomenon
    that a word can have different meanings dependent on the context it is
    used in.}
}
@TECHREPORT{Bergmair2005related,
  author = {Richard Bergmair and Stefan Katzenbeisser},
  title = {Content-Aware Steganography: About Lazy Prisoners and
    Narrow-Minded Wardens},
  year = 2005,
  month = DEC,
  url = {http://richard.bergmair.eu/pub/hipstego-doc.pdf},
  institution = {Technische Universit\"at M\"unchen,
    Institut f\"ur Informatik AI/Cognition Group},
  issn = {0941-6358},
  abstract = {We introduce content-aware steganography as a new paradigm of
    steganography stemming from a shift in perspectives towards the
    objects of steganography. In particular, we abandon the point of 
    view that steganographic objects can be considered pieces of
    data, suggesting that they should rather be considered
    pieces of information. We provide some evidence to suggest
    that this shift in perspectives is in fact necessary, and
    pinpoint a semantic problem that has not received
    sufficient attention in the past. We also propose a solution to
    this problem, by putting forward a new kind of steganography
    that employs human interactive proofs as a security primitive.},
  number = {fki-252-05}
}
@INPROCEEDINGS{Bergmair2006related,
  author = {Richard Bergmair and Stefan Katzenbeisser},
  title = {Content-Aware Steganography: About Lazy Prisoners and
    Narrow-Minded Wardens},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 8th Information Hiding Workshop},
  year = {2006},
  series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
  publisher = {Springer Verlag},
  location = {Alexandria, VA},
  abstract = {We introduce content-aware steganography as a new paradigm of
    steganography stemming from a shift in perspectives towards the
    objects of steganography. In particular, we abandon the point of
    view that steganographic objects can be considered pieces of
    data, suggesting that they should rather be considered
    pieces of information. We provide some evidence to suggest
    that this shift in perspectives is in fact necessary, and
    pinpoint a semantic problem that has not received
    sufficient attention in the past. We also propose a solution to
    this problem, by putting forward a new kind of steganography
    that employs human interactive proofs as a security primitive.},
  note = {in print}
}