tempbib5.bib

@MASTERSTHESIS{Chapman1997,
  author = {Mark T. Chapman},
  title = {Hiding The Hidden:
    {A} Software System for Concealing Ciphertext as Innocuous Text},
  school = {University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee},
  month = {May},
  year = {1997},
  pages = {viii + 74},
  url = {http://www.nicetext.com/doc/thesis.ps},
  keywords = {ciphertext, privacy, information hiding},
  abstract = {In this thesis we present a system for protecting the privacy
    of cryptograms to avoid detection by censors. The system transforms
    ciphertext into innocuous text which is transformed back into the original
    ciphertext. The expandable set of tools allows experimentation with custom
    dictionaries, automatic simulation of writing style, and the use of
    Context-Free Grammars to control text generation.}
}
@INPROCEEDINGS{Chapman1997a,
  author = {Mark T. Chapman and George I. Davida},
  title = {Hiding the Hidden:
    {A} Software System for Concealing Ciphertext as Innocuous Text},
  booktitle = {Information and Communications Security:
    First International Conference},
  editor = {Yongfei Han Tatsuaki, Okamoto Sihan Qing},
  location = {Beijing, China},
  month = {August},
  year = {1997},
  publisher = {Springer},
  series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
  volume = {1334},
  isbn = {3-540-63696-X},
  url = {http://www.nicetext.com/doc/icics97.ps},
  abstract = {In this paper we present a system for protecting the privacy of
    cryptograms to avoid detection by censors. The system transforms
    ciphertext into innocuous text which can be transformed back into the
    original ciphertext. The expandable set of tools allows experimentation
    with custom dictionaries, automatic simulation of writing style, and the
    use of Context-Free Grammars to control text generation.}
}
@INPROCEEDINGS{Chapman2001,
  author = {Mark T. Chapman and George I. Davida and Marc Rennhard},
  title = {A Practical and Effective Approach to
    Large-Scale Automated Linguistic Steganography},
  booktitle = {Information Security: Fourth International Conference},
  editor = {George I. Davida and Yair Frankel},
  location = {Malaga, Spain},
  month = {October},
  year = {2001},
  publisher = {Springer},
  series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
  volume = {2200},
  pages = {156ff},
  issn = {0302-9743},
  url = {http://www.nicetext.com/doc/isc01.ps,
    http://www.tik.ee.ethz.ch/~rennhard/publications/als.pdf},
  abstract = {Several automated techniques exist to transform ciphertext into
    text that looks like natural-language text while retaining the ability to
    recover the original ciphertext. This transformation changes the
    ciphertext so that it doesn't attract undue attention from, for example,
    attackers or agencies or organizations that might want to detect or censor
    encrypted communication. Although it is relatively easy to generate a
    small sample of quality text, it is challenging to be able to generate
    large texts that are meaningful to a human reader and which appear
    innocuous. 

    This paper expands on a previous approach that used sentence models and
    large dictionaries of words classified by part-of-speech. By using an
    extensible contextual template approach combined with a synonym-based
    replacement strategy, much more realistic text is generated than was
    possible with NICETEXT.}
}
@INPROCEEDINGS{Chapman2002,
  author = {Mark T. Chapman and George I. Davida},
  title = {Plausible Deniability Using Automated Linguistic Steganography},
  booktitle = {Infrastructure Security: International Conference},
  editor = {George I. Davida and Yair Frankel},
  location = {Bristol, UK},
  month = {October},
  year = {2002},
  publisher = {Springer},
  series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
  volume = {2437},
  pages = {276--287},
  issn = {0302-9743},
  url = {http://www.nicetext.com/doc/infrasec02.ps},
  abstract = {Information hiding has several applications, one of which is to
    hide the use of cryptography. The Nicetext system introduced a method for
    hiding cryptographic information by converting cryptographic strings
    (random-looking) into nice text (namely innocuous looking). The system
    retains the ability to recover the original ciphertext from the generated
    text. Nicetext can hide both plaintext and cryptographic text. 

    The purpose of such transformations are to mask ciphertext from anyone who
    wants to detect or censor encrypted communication, such as a corporation
    that may monitor, or censor, its employee private mail. Even if the
    message is identified as the output of Nicetext, the sender might claim
    that the input was simply a pseudo-random number source rather than
    ciphertext. 

    This paper extends the Nicetext protocol to enable deniable
    cryptography/messaging using the concepts of plausible deniability [1].
    Deniability is derived from the fact that even if one is forced to reveal
    a key to the random string that nice text reverts to, the real
    cryptographic/plaintext messages may be stored within additional required
    sources of randomness in the extended protocol.}
}